Category Archives: Oracle

Want to become an {EDC} Developer? Take this test

I have been contacted on multiple occasions in recent years about how to become an {EDC} Developer or clinical programmer.

If you are currently working in the industry, the transition should be swift.  But for those working outside the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry, I recommend you take a SAS programming course or data analytics/ visualization course since {EDC} training only is available for those already in the industry and for those sponsored by your employer.  There is no official public training for a specific {EDC} tool. Your company must be a user (Customer) of the tool for you to gain some knowledge.

Here are some examples of custom programs. Test your readiness.

Example 1:

Comparing two (2) strings a and b:

string dbtool=”Rave”;

if (dbtool == “Rave”)

if (dbtool.Equals(“Rave”))

OR how about…

String strA;

String strB;

If (strA == strB)

{

System.console.writeline (“StringA’s value is same as StringB’s value.”);

}

 

Example 2:

Switch case:  to store a value in int x if the value of n is “RAVE”, 2 if y is “INFORM”, 3 if y is “OCRDC”, and 0 otherwise.

switch (n)

{

case “1”:

Console.WriteLine(“You choosed RAVE”);

intVarEDC ==1;  break;

case “2”:

Console.WriteLine(“You choosed INFORM”);

intVarEDC ==2; break;

case “3”:

Console.WriteLine(“You choosed OCRDC”);

intVarEDC==3;  break;

default:

Console.WriteLine(“Invalid selection {0}”, n);

Console.WriteLine(“Please input 1, 2, or 3”);

intVarEDC == 0; break;

}

Example 3: Arrays

Can you guess the output to this program?

public static void printf(params object[] args)

{

for (int i = 0; i < args.Length; i++)

{

Console.WriteLine(“args[{0}] = {1}”, i args[i]);

}

}

public static void Main()

{

printf(“Thank you”, 4, “visiting”, “EDC Developer.”, “Says”);

}

Some tips or best practices when working with Rave Edit checks and custom fuctions:

  • Always put record position 0 in Edit Check Steps and Actions for standard DataPoints
    • Note: In the recent release of Rave, this is mandatory.
  • Use ChangeCount Property wherever possible to execute only for the submitted datapoints.
    • ex: If (dpAETERM != null && dpAETERM.Active && dpAETERM.ChangeCount  > 0)
  • Avoid using “true” parameter in the FetchAllDataPointsForOIDPath for Log forms.
    • Bad example: datapoints dpAE = CustomFunction.FetchAllDataPointsForOIDPath(“AESEV”, “AE”, “AE”, subject, true)
    • Good example: datapoints dpAE = CustomFunction.FetchAllDataPointsForOIDPath(“AESEV”, “AE”, “AE”, subject)

If you wrote similar programs or are comfortable writing these types of programs then you are ready for your next challenge. But if you do not know anything about C sharp programming or {EDC} in general, don’t despair. We are here to help.

Subscribe to my blog’s RSS feed and email newsletter to get immediate updates on the latest news, articles, and tips. I am available on LinkedIn or my personal webpages: EDC Developer or Clinical Programmer. Or contact me to discuss any projects or contracts you may have and need support with.

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The Only Three (3) [Programming] Languages You Should Learn Right Now (eClinical Speaking)

On a previous article that I wrote in 2012, I mentioned 4 programming languages that you should be learning when it comes to the development of clinical trials. Why is this important, you may ask? Clinical Trials is a method to determine if a new drug or treatment will work on disease or will it be beneficial to patients. Anayansi Gamboa - Clinical Data Management Process If you have never written a line of code in your life, you are in the right place. If you have some programming experience, but interesting in learning clinical programming, this information can be helpful.

But shouldn’t I be Learning ________?

Here are the latest eClinical programming languages you should learn:

1. SAS®: Data analysis and result reporting are two major tasks to SAS® programers. Currently, SAS is offering certifications as a Clinical Trials Programmer. Some of the skills you should learned are:

  • clinical trials process
  • accessing, managing, and transforming clinical trials data
  • statistical procedures and macro programming
  • reporting clinical trials results
  • validating clinical trial data reporting

2. ODM/XML: Operational Data Modeling or ODM uses XML to build the standard data exchange models that are being developed to support the data acquisition, exchange and archiving of operational data.

3. CDISC Language: Yes. This is not just any code. This is the standard language on clinical trials and you should be learning it right now. The future is here now. The EDC code as we know it will eventually go away as more and more vendors try to adapt their systems and technologies to meet rules and regulations. Some of the skills you should learn:

  • Annotation of variables and variable values – SDTM aCRF
  • Define XML – CDISC SDTM datasets
  • ADaM datasets – CDISC ADaM datasets

CDISC has established data standards to speed-up data review and FDA is now suggesting that soon this will become the norm. Pharmaceuticals, bio-technologies companies and many sponsors within clinical research are now better equipped to improve CDISC implementation.

Everyone should learn to code

Therefore, SAS® and XML are now cooperating. XML Engine in SAS® v9.0 is built up so one can import a wide variety of XML documentation. SAS® does what is does best – statistics, and XML does what it does best – creating reportquality tables by taking advantage of the full feature set of the publishing software. This conversation can produce report-quality tables in an automated hands-off/light out process.

Standards are more than just CDISC

If you are looking for your next career in Clinical Data Management, then SAS and CDISC SDTM should land you into the right path of career development and job security.

Conclusion: Learn the basics and advanced SAS clinical programming concepts such as reading and manipulating clinical data. Using the clinical features and basic SAS programming concepts of clinical trials, you will be able to import ADAM, CDISC or other standards for domain structure and contents into the metadata, build clinical domain target table metadata from those standards, create jobs to load clinical domains, validate the structure and content of the clinical domains based on the standards, and to generate CDISC standard define.xml files that describes the domain tables for clinical submissions.

Anayansi Gamboa has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica – Open Source and Oracle Clinical.

Disclaimer: The legal entity on this blog is registered as Doing Business As (DBA) – Trade Name – Fictitious Name – Assumed Name as “GAMBOA”.

Source:

SAS Institute
CDISC

Where in the World is Ana?

First, I want to say thank you for reading my blog, connecting with me on LinkedIn or following whenever I go [thank you NSA].

Many of you, for months, have asked me if I was going to write more articles related to clinical trials. For sometime now, I have taking time-off from this EDC blog and concentrated on some other projects of equal importance. I will share some new insights and information as I get myself back on track.

So what is a girl who has a master’s degree in project management and computer networks doing as a programmer? It’s not that I didn’t like project management, per se. And entering in the IT network business years ago was quite difficult for girls like me in a world dominated by men. It’s basically that I didn’t find myself with the same passion for project management or computer networks that I have for programming and technology in general.

Because I am so interested in technology and programming, I tend to spend a lot more time than my peers in learning new technologies, and enhancing my existing skills. Many of my co-workers and ex-collega (Dutch) have commented on their admiration that my skill level is as high as it is, and that I am able to learn new technologies so quickly. But beyond just learning new technologies and APIs, I’m passionate about becoming a better overall programmer. Reason why in the last few months, I spent time learning IOs development (iPhone and Android apps). I am actually working on an app to ‘hack’ into my own car. 🙂 Well, not exactly. I want to be able to open my car and do some other basic command (like opening the garage door) using an APP.

Given my degree in project management, it should be clear that I have useful skills beyond the programming world. In fact, having a project management background has helped me interface with various groups in various organizations in which I’ve worked.

I have installed, maintained, and designed numerous relational databases and small networks. As a freelancer, I have worked in projects doing data analysis, project support and computer training.

Now you know a little about me personally. If you think I might be the type of developer you’re looking for, feel free to browse my resume and contact me.

Anayansi Gamboa
Resume / CV .

Comments? Join us at {EDC Developer}

P.S. I will be releasing some training videos / training material for several EDC tools in the near future including tips and best practices. Price has not been setup yet. All training will be web-based, password protected. If you wish to consult with me for a face-to-face training or on-site training, please contact me to discuss further.

Fair Use Notice: This video contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational, and/or criticism or commentary use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their website or wants us to add their photo.

Disclaimer: The EDC Developer blog is “one man’s opinion”. Anything that is said on the report is either opinion, criticism, information or commentary, If making any type of investment or legal decision it would be wise to contact or consult a professional before making that decision.

Disclaimer:De inhoud van deze columns weerspiegelen niet per definitie de mening van {EDC Developer}.

Disclaimer: The legal entity on this blog is registered as Doing Business As (DBA) – Trade Name – Fictitious Name – Assumed Name as “GAMBOA”.

Professional Timeline – Clinical Programmer

Professional Timeline

Curriculum Vitae
CV

 

anayansi gamboa

Before Your Trial Goes Live – InForm FastStart

When EDC is used in a clinical trial, electronic case report form (e-CRF) data are defined to be the data that are manually entered into a computer by the patient or by the investigator’s staff.

CDISC defines e-CRF as a CRF in which related data items and their associated comments, notes, and signatures are linked electronically.

e-CRFs may include special display elements, electronic edit checks and other special properties or functions used for both capture and display of the linked data.

Prior to submitting a request – FastStart, you should throughly test your trial.

Technically speaking, FastStart requests ensures base is cooked when sending all UAT versions of the trial, Training and Production versions of the trial to Oracle implementation team. This will vary on the type of contract your company / sponsor has with them.

Your company or sponsor may have a setup of ‘Implementation’ instructions that will be provided to Oracle HSG (formerly PhaseForward) that includes all files, summary and instructions for each implementation. Some of these required files or special files are listed below.

Special Files:

Filename Contents
Customresources.XML Collects references to any html files that will be use to override standard InForm functionality within the trial. Includes the visit calculator (VISITCALCULATOR.HTML) and confirmation of enrollment message (ENROLLMENTCONFIRM.HTML).
InsertUsers.XML User details
InsertSites.XML Site details
InsertSiteGroups.XML Links users with specific sites
InsertGroups.XML Defines the properties and contents of groups e.g. queries, items
InsertRightsGroups.XML Groups multiple access rights, with details of specific users that are assigned those rights.Also contains details of any overrides to default levels of access at item level
InsertSignCRF.XML Defines form to be signed and group who have access to sign
Crbaffadavit.TXT Affadavit text which appears when signing the eCRF (used at eCRF level). The text is standard, but protocol number must be amended for each trial. NOTE: This file will be used for any trials using casebook level signatures.
logo.jpg Your company logo
EnrollmentOverride.htmlHomedefault.html Here you can modify your trial name

The eSignature is a replacement for the Investigator’s physical signature (paper form). This file captures confirmtion from the Investigator that he has reviewed and confirmed the information on each eCRF is accurate. This Affidavit text contains something like ‘I, Principal Investigator, for study 9999999, confirm I have reviewed this CRF form….’

Investigator– 21 CFR 50.3(d) defines the investigator as “The individual who actually conducts a clinical investigation – i.e., under whose immediate direction the test article is administered.”

Some recomendations about eSignature can be further research on Secure Access For Everyone (SAFE) standards. The goal is that once the investigator is credentialed by SAFE, his/her identity and electronic signature can be used by all SAFE compliant sponsors.

InsertUsers File

Training must be provided to sponsors users prior to granting access to an InForm trial. For example, CRAs will need to be well trained on all aspects of the EDC system in order to provide coaching for the investigator. This file documents all sponsors and site staff users within each clinical trial.

Easy, wasn’t it? Again, build your trial and test to make sure all files were cooked and working as expected. Log into your trial and ensure that the special files appear correctly. Enroll a subject to ensure the enrollment confirmation screen appears and, if used in the trial, the visit calculator appears.

Reference:

Electronic Clinical Data Capture, Position Paper Revision 1, May 1, 2005

How to manage Sites and Users in InForm Trial

Your comments and questions are valued and encouraged.
Anayansi Gamboa has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica, Open Source and Oracle Clinical.

Open Source versus Commercial Systems

Types of EDC Systems: Commercial and Open Source

EDC systems can either be standalone databases on a desktop computer/server supporting a single site or they can be Web based with the ability to support multisite studies [1, 3, 27]. Based on the business model utilized and the licensing-distribution method followed, they can be broadly categorized as commercial and open-source EDC systems. Commercial EDC applications are usually developed by a for-profit company or developer group. They charge for user licenses with or without annual support contracts while the source code is not published. Some examples include Oracle® Clinical (Oracle, USA) [31], Clinsys® (Jubilant Organosys, USA) [6], InForm™ (Phase forward, USA) [22] DATATRAK Electronic Data Capture (DATATRAK, USA) [8]. On the other hand, free and open-source software are applications developed by a single or group of developers, often as a voluntary effort. The application and its source code are published online and users can download them without any cost. Some examples include DADOS P (Research on Research group, Duke University, USA) [7] OpenClinica® (Akaza Research, USA) [30], Redcap (Vanderbilt University, USA) [34] and TrialDB (Yale University, USA) [43] .

opensource_commercial

Commercial EDC Systems

Commercial EDC systems can either be purchased as a software package or through a license with periodic support either included in the package or charged separately. In some cases, users have to pay a one-time license fee while in other cases users can renew their license periodically. Troubleshooting and guidance are usually provided under support plans while bugs in the application are rectified and released under regular updates.

Commercial EDC applications are usually easy to use in light of the quality of documentation and customer support extended to users. Well-designed interfaces are responsible for their user-friendly design. Multiple levels of user access, security, adherence to industry and regulatory standards, support for the design of eCRF’s, data entry, and management are features common to many commercial EDC applications. Some of them may also be able to generate reports, for example, DATATRAK One™ (DATATRAK international Inc, USA) [8], Entrypoint Plus® (Phoenix Software International Inc, USA) [10], and CliniProteus (Roskamp Bioinformatics Core, USA) [5]. Although standalone EDC systems are prevalent, they are increasingly being offered as a part of a complete clinical trial management system (CTMS). For example Oracle Clinical and InForm are offered as a part of a larger CTMS.

Despite the benefits, commercial EDC systems are expensive [13] and frequently non-customizable. They have been considered inadequate in context to the needs of healthcare stakeholders (clinicians, administrators, and patients) [46]. Given the variety of clinical practices and research methods used, commercial EDC systems may not fit into the workflow at each clinical/research site, thus having implications on their effective and efficient use. Many of them do not support interoperable data standards, i.e. it may not be possible to merge data exported out of one EDC with data exported from another EDC system or research/clinical application. As a result data from multiple studies or sources cannot be merged and utilized for answering research questions. Since the source code is not released, users must depend on the developer group or vendor for customization and support-related requirements. This limitation is frequently referred to as “vendor lock-in,” which makes further development and maintenance of commercial EDC an expensive effort.

We reviewed the web to identify some of the prominent and popular commercial EDC systems. They include Oracle® Clinical, InForm™ and Rave® (Table 1). Among themselves they hold a larger share of the EDC market [3]. Other examples include DATATRAK and eTrials EDC (Merge Healthcare) [8, 11].

Oracle® Clinical [31] is a commercial EDC system for conduction of clinical studies and trials. It is a core component of an integrated eClinical research solution that integrates adverse event report reporting, thesaurus management, trial management and remote data capture features in a single application.

InForm™ [22] global trial management system delivers a variety of features essential for the effective and streamlined implementation of clinical studies and trials. It sports an impressive study setup page, scalability and has separate EDC and CDMS databases. Other features include an intuitive interface, streamlined workflow, reporting and analysis tools that help the study team to work more efficiently. It can also be seamlessly integrated with randomization, trial design, and medical coding modules.

The Rave® (Medidata solutions) [36] platform is another industry leader in EDC systems. It has an impressive study design tool that nullifies the need for programming skills. It offers a single, flexible and scalable platform that captures, manages and reports clinical research data. It also undertakes a balanced approach between ease of use, features and functionalities. It has the flexibility to interface with legacy systems, adheres to CDISC clinical data standards and sports a plugin for modifying the interface and functionality.

DATATRAK Electronic Data Capture has considerable market presence [8]. Its features range from patient data management, electronic forms, supports queries, alerts and visit scheduling and generation of custom reports. It is also equipped with custom checklists and workviews, configurable tools for data cleaning, real time statistical support and an integrated medical coding package.

eTrials EDC [11] is a web based application that collects, manages and analyzes clinical trial information in real time. It is a user-friendly yet robust application with an in-built workflow. It can generate reports and can easily integrate with data from other applications.

Despite being feature rich, scalable, secure and compliant to industry standards, these EDC systems are prohibitively expensive [13], thus limiting their use by individual investigators and users from developing countries that do not having adequate funding but are interested in research participation.

Open-source EDC Systems

Open and freely available source code released under open distribution licenses like general public license [14] is the defining feature in this category of EDC systems. Open source code generates a large community of users and developers that interact, modify, and enrich the source code over a period of time and report bugs and solutions, thereby enhancing the quality, features, and value of the EDC system. In order to sustain an open source license, developers usually charge for customization requests. The same is applicable to troubleshooting and support, which are usually delivered through a yearly contract or support plan. Thus, by providing free access to the source code and annulling restrictions on use, modification, and distribution, open-source EDC systems form an attractive alternative for users.

The availability of inexpensive (or free) open source EDC applications for individual physicians/researchers, departments, and institutes has the potential to improve clinical and research activities and enhance academic standards by reaching a wider audience. Since further development/customization and ownership costs are lower, institutional administrators can modify and adapt open-source EDC systems to suit their environment and workflow, thus ensuring the success of EDC implementation. User-friendly and simple interfaces, adherence to industry standard security protocols, customizability, interoperability, and low maintenance costs are some of the major benefits of open-source EDC systems. Additionally, the presence of user support groups and communities ensures continuing support.

Although open-source EDC systems have a unique mix of features, their adoption in healthcare organizations has been slow. Software cost and maintenance are not the only features that influence decision makers. For an institution/organization-wide implementation, decision makers usually prefer and opt for EDC systems that are easy to deploy, manage, and support. Not all open-source EDC systems qualify for the same. In addition, dependence on the developer community for support and updates may cripple the organization if the community stops being productive. It is possible to address this issue by hiring programmers who could work on further development and maintenance, But locating and training relevant workforce is a challenge as in many cases the background technology has a steep learning curve.

DADOS Prospective, OpenClinica® and Redcap are examples of open source EDC systems. DADOS Prospective is a Web-based application developed by the research on research group (RoR) [37] to support data collection activities among researchers, research groups, and research networks [7]. It enables users to replicate any case report form into an eCRF, collect data in single/multisite studies, and extract data in an interoperable format. It is compliant with Chapter 11, Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations [4] and Health Privacy and Accountability Act (HIPAA) guidelines for EDC. It can be used to streamline and support individual/departmental/institutional databases, registries, and single/multisite clinical/nonclinical studies and clinical at a low cost [28].

OpenClinica® [30] is an open source application that has both EDC and data management capabilities. As an EDC system, it not only facilitates collection, validation, and annotation of clinical data but also has features that allow study audits, reporting and data extraction.

Research electronic data capture—‘Redcap’ is an open source metadata driven application designed for the clinical and translational research target audience by Vanderbilt. Its features include: a streamlined process for building a database, an intuitive and secure data collection interface that supports data validation and automated data export in multiple formats. It also supports other advanced features such as branch logic and file upload. It is freely available to its consortium partners with a modest personnel investment of < 0.5 FTE that covers training and support activities [16, 34].

Source:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3049639/

Articles from Clinical Orthopaedics and Related ResearcH
1Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
2Research on Research Group, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC USA
3Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3094, Durham, NC 27710 USA
4National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore, Singapore
Ricardo Pietrobon, Email: rpietro@duke.edu.
FAIR USE-
“Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.”

Your comments and questions are valued and encouraged.
Anayansi Gamboa has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica, Open Source and Oracle Clinical.

4 Programming Languages You Should Learn Right Now (eClinical Speaking)

I am a strong believer that learning a new language makes you better at the others, but I am not a “learn to code” advocate since a foreign language (I know 3 languages and currently learning my 4th and I have a “to learn” language including Italian and Arabic, if I ever find some free time) or even music (I love to play drums) are equally beneficial. But if you want to obtain a job in the pharmaceutical industry, here are the list of programming languages you should learn:

  1. C#:

What it is: A general-purpose, compiled, object-oriented programming language developed by Microsoft as part of its .NET initiative.

Why you should learn it: If you are looking to become a Medidata Custom Function programmer or Oracle InForm EDC Developer then you should.

2. Python:

What it is: An interpreted, dynamically object-oriented, open-source programming language that utilizes automatic memory management.

Why you should learn it: If you are like me always looking to learn new technology, love Google platforms and perhaps want to become a Timaeus Trial Builder, you should learn it. It is used on a lot open-source technologies.

Everyone should learn to code

3. PL/SQL or SQL:

What it is: PL/SQL stands for Procedural Language/SQL.

Why you should learn it: If you are like me additive to databases then Oracle should be your choice. If you want to become an Oracle Clinical programmer or Database administrator, you should learn Oracle PL/SQL.

4- SAS

What it is: SAS stands for “Statistical Analysis System” (software). It is the most powerful and comprehensive statistics software available.

Why you should learn it: SAS skills are in high demand nowadays. If you are able to obtain the SAS Certification and a few years of experience in the Pharmaceutical industry, you will be in good shape. If you are new and looking for training there are several options available from SAS Institute to private vendors such as Clinovo to even learning on your own. I most warn you as it will be difficult to obtain a job without experience. Nevertheless, once you are in, it can only get better.

Remember that your job is not just to code but to solve real problems. Your ability to code covers a lot of range of skills: from critical thinking, problem analysis & solving, logic, etc.

So which one are you going to give a try?

Let me know what is your preference. Happy Programming!

The best thing about a boolean is even if you are wrong, you are only off by a bit.(Anonymous)

Anayansi Gamboa has an extensive background in clinical data management as well as experience with different EDC systems including Oracle InForm, InForm Architect, Central Designer, CIS, Clintrial, Medidata Rave, Central Coding, OpenClinica Open Source and Oracle Clinical.

Disclaimer: The legal entity on this blog is registered as Doing Business As (DBA) – Trade Name – Fictitious Name – Assumed Name as “GAMBOA”.

Source:
SAS Institute
Learn PL/SQL

Oracle Clinical (OC) Cheat Sheet

OC Shortcuts

Code Description
Space Bar Check or uncheck Checkbox
CRTL+Q Back up to last screen and/or Exit
F3 Copy data from row above
F6 Insert new record below
F7 Enter into Query mode
F8 Execute Query
F9 List of Values (LOV) for entry
F10 Save
ROUND ROUND(number,precision) – Rounds number to the decimal value determined in the precision parameter
e.g. ROUND(BMI,1)
TRUNC TRUNC(number) – Removes decimal places from number
e.g. TRUNC(WEIGHT)
NVL NVL(string,’value if null’) – Returns specified value if string is null
e.g. NVL(VITALS.VISITDT,’01’)
DECODE DECODE(expression,value1, return1, value2, return2,,,,,, default) – Functions as an inline if statement. If the expression results in value 1, then report return1, and so on. If no values are found function returns the default.e.g. DECODE(VISIT_NO,10,20,30,40,50,88,99)
UPPER/LOWER UPPER(string) / LOWER(string) – Sets string to all uppercase or lowercase
e.g. UPPER(AETERM)
LOWER(AETERM)
LENGTH LENGTH(string) – Returns an integer value of the length of the value of the string
e.g. LENGTH(ENROLL.RANDOMNO) < 6

Source: OC User Manual

SQL Basics – Part 2: Create Tables and Variables and more

We’ll dive into CREATE command. We’ll ‘Create’ Tables, Temp Tables, Table Variables and Variables. We are going to ‘Insert’ data into this table (INSERT INTO) and we’ll occasionally ‘DROP’ the tables

FAIR USE-
“Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.”